San Francisco Luxurist
gemselect:

Spinel is a gemstone that is highly regarded by gem dealers and collectors, but is still largely unknown to most consumers.
Since the supply is too limited to supply most retail jewelers, you will rarely find spinel in your local jewelry store. Gem collectors prize spinel for its brilliance, hardness and wide range of colors.
In addition to rich reds, spinel can be found in a range of lovely pastel shades of pink, purple and blue.
Picture above is a 3.07 deep purple spinel gem. Click the image for more details.

gemselect:

Spinel is a gemstone that is highly regarded by gem dealers and collectors, but is still largely unknown to most consumers.

Since the supply is too limited to supply most retail jewelers, you will rarely find spinel in your local jewelry store. Gem collectors prize spinel for its brilliance, hardness and wide range of colors.

In addition to rich reds, spinel can be found in a range of lovely pastel shades of pink, purple and blue.

Picture above is a 3.07 deep purple spinel gem. Click the image for more details.

Nearly 19 cts, this Peridot Ring is stunning.
Peridot, Diamonds and Platinum

Source Image: Betteridge- Greenwich CT

Nearly 19 cts, this Peridot Ring is stunning.

Peridot, Diamonds and Platinum

Source Image: Betteridge- Greenwich CT

Peridot: The Color Trap
(Image source: Bulgari USA)

I’ve often wondered why so many people harbor a love hate relationship with the Peridot gemstone. In all my years dealing people and jewelry in some form or another, I’ve often heard statements that resemble this: “Unfortunately Peridot is my Birthstone, or I don’t much care for my birthstone”.  This would always make me a little sad. I find beauty in just about every gem, I think it is just a matter of how you view it.
Peridot suffers from the old “Semi-precious” stigma that far too many retailers & designers mass marketed (and some still do to my disappointment), and inexperienced sales people still use this term. Sadly it somehow cheapens the gemstones they are referring to. All gems are precious. Though in truth some might have a larger pocket value simply due to it being a “Precious gemstone” like a diamond or ruby for example. I submit to you this… a poor quality diamond, will never be as pretty as the best of the best in a peridot, yet most people will never get a chance to see the best of the best in peridot…but they will be inundated with showcases upon showcases of low quality/commercial grade diamonds (and they will consume, consume, consume). Leaving Peridot in its fine qualities trapped in someone’s vault as an item to horde and covet…and the unaware masses turning their noses at the sight of inferior stones which they believe to be all that  there is to be had. Just remember you only get what you demand.
Peridot also suffers from a color trap…lower grades and lighter colors are mass marketed as birthstone jewelry and multicolor jewelry, mixed in with Garnets, Amethyst and Blue Topaz, where it simply blends in, and not many people want to wear a rainbow everyday (those that do, more power to you). Higher grades and outstanding colors in Peridot are very much sought out by connoisseurs and people with deep pockets, so the general public rarely gets to see what the peridot is capable of bringing to the table in terms of best in class.  The myth and legend of Cleopatra’s “Emeralds” should be used more often to romance the best a Peridot can offer, if the association with coveted gems like Emeralds can give Peridot some lift, they why not? It is after all believed that the Peridots found on Egypt’s Zeberget island were some of the Famous emeralds owned by Cleopatra. I am taking some liberties here because in Antiquity and before advancements in gemology gemstones were grouped together by color (ex: Green stones were thought to be emeralds, Red stones Ruby etc…) Truly spectacular peridot has the tones and hues of fine emeralds, yet there is that little hint of Olivine that makes Peridot its very own shade of green….after all a green by any other name is not “Envy nor Emerald”.
Forget what you’ve seen regarding Peridot in the past, new mines have provided awesome colors in recent years and designers have provided their support (High quality Peridot is quite lovely in high-karat gold, and makes a great focal point) and the color green has found its place as a fashion staple.  So never mind the Kiwi and olive references you’ve come to know, go forth and find a reconnection with your birthstone, it is the kindest thing you can do.
My rant is over, so Happy Birthday (belated and to come) to all my followers born in August…let us get on to celebrating the gemstone Peridot.
~BBT
Peridot: The Color Trap
(Image source: Bulgari USA)

I’ve often wondered why so many people harbor a love hate relationship with the Peridot gemstone. In all my years dealing people and jewelry in some form or another, I’ve often heard statements that resemble this: “Unfortunately Peridot is my Birthstone, or I don’t much care for my birthstone”.  This would always make me a little sad. I find beauty in just about every gem, I think it is just a matter of how you view it.

Peridot suffers from the old “Semi-precious” stigma that far too many retailers & designers mass marketed (and some still do to my disappointment), and inexperienced sales people still use this term. Sadly it somehow cheapens the gemstones they are referring to. All gems are precious. Though in truth some might have a larger pocket value simply due to it being a “Precious gemstone” like a diamond or ruby for example. I submit to you this… a poor quality diamond, will never be as pretty as the best of the best in a peridot, yet most people will never get a chance to see the best of the best in peridot…but they will be inundated with showcases upon showcases of low quality/commercial grade diamonds (and they will consume, consume, consume). Leaving Peridot in its fine qualities trapped in someone’s vault as an item to horde and covet…and the unaware masses turning their noses at the sight of inferior stones which they believe to be all that  there is to be had. Just remember you only get what you demand.

Peridot also suffers from a color trap…lower grades and lighter colors are mass marketed as birthstone jewelry and multicolor jewelry, mixed in with Garnets, Amethyst and Blue Topaz, where it simply blends in, and not many people want to wear a rainbow everyday (those that do, more power to you). Higher grades and outstanding colors in Peridot are very much sought out by connoisseurs and people with deep pockets, so the general public rarely gets to see what the peridot is capable of bringing to the table in terms of best in class.  The myth and legend of Cleopatra’s “Emeralds” should be used more often to romance the best a Peridot can offer, if the association with coveted gems like Emeralds can give Peridot some lift, they why not? It is after all believed that the Peridots found on Egypt’s Zeberget island were some of the Famous emeralds owned by Cleopatra. I am taking some liberties here because in Antiquity and before advancements in gemology gemstones were grouped together by color (ex: Green stones were thought to be emeralds, Red stones Ruby etc…) Truly spectacular peridot has the tones and hues of fine emeralds, yet there is that little hint of Olivine that makes Peridot its very own shade of green….after all a green by any other name is not “Envy nor Emerald”.

Forget what you’ve seen regarding Peridot in the past, new mines have provided awesome colors in recent years and designers have provided their support (High quality Peridot is quite lovely in high-karat gold, and makes a great focal point) and the color green has found its place as a fashion staple.  So never mind the Kiwi and olive references you’ve come to know, go forth and find a reconnection with your birthstone, it is the kindest thing you can do.

My rant is over, so Happy Birthday (belated and to come) to all my followers born in August…let us get on to celebrating the gemstone Peridot.

~BBT

Art Deco Diamond Brooch

Art Deco Diamond Brooch

nijikodesigns:

Dreamscape(TM) cut gemstones by John Dyer & Co.

http://www.johndyergems.com/catalog_pages/catalog_main.html

John Dyer is such a genius lapidarist. The Ametrine is other worldly perfect. I shall own one of his creations…one day.

For some reason I picture this ring on the finger of someone singing one of the Queen of the Night arias wearing a matching crown of claws….Gothic awesomeness if you ask me.

For some reason I picture this ring on the finger of someone singing one of the Queen of the Night arias wearing a matching crown of claws….Gothic awesomeness if you ask me.

jeffreyhunt:

Tumbuka Fulu in Nigerian Tourmaline  |   5.85 carats  |  Gemstone Design by Jeffrey Hunt.

This would be an awesome focal point stone in a diamond, platinum and 18kt yellow gold necklace. A must for the October baby’s collection.

jeffreyhunt:

Tumbuka Fulu in Nigerian Tourmaline  |   5.85 carats  |  Gemstone Design by Jeffrey Hunt.

This would be an awesome focal point stone in a diamond, platinum and 18kt yellow gold necklace. A must for the October baby’s collection.

What an interesting study in random acts of kindness? I really wish more people behaved like this…Human Kindness is definitely in short supply, one random act of kindness could change someone’s day from bad to great.

Fancy Colored Diamonds need not be huge to make a statement. My original band ring altered…previously the center was a square shaped purple sapphire. 

Source:
Sanfranciscoluxurist
(Author’s collection)

Fancy Colored Diamonds need not be huge to make a statement. My original band ring altered…previously the center was a square shaped purple sapphire.

Source:
Sanfranciscoluxurist
(Author’s collection)

The square shape (princess-cut) lends itself quite well to colored gems, like this blue sapphire set in platinum.

Source:

Sanfranciscoluxurist
(Author’s collection)

The square shape (princess-cut) lends itself quite well to colored gems, like this blue sapphire set in platinum.

Source:

Sanfranciscoluxurist
(Author’s collection)